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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
understood the rules better than petraeus and understood exactly the environment in which he was operating and yet he still turned out to be a very different person than who most of us thought he was. >> my friend dan jenkins once wrote a is a tire cal -- satiracal, the 10 stages of drunkenness, skip dinner and number seven, i'm invincible. but particularly men in power, by the way, we rarely if ever hear of any woman involved in this thing that's made public. but anyway, particularly with petraeus, lived in danger for a long time, lived with risk, and risk can be addictive. and the adventure, the risk and then because you're in a position feeling, i'm invincible, i'm invisible. it's a mirage but very easy to believe the higher you go. chris: i think it's called in the old days beer glasses. you can see through those lenses and don't see rationally. >> that raises another point why aren't there women in positions of power you hear this about. i think there's still, women are more attracted to men in positions of power and men aren't exactly attracted to women in positions of power. >> ther
. not the revenue. the revenue is nice if we don't hurt people. the goal is to save the environment and reduce global warming. >>stuart: you think carbon taxes will save the land it? >>guest: yes. we need to reduce the carbon emissions. >>stuart: are you worried about the next big storm because we are putting out too much carbon? >>guest: i am. a lot of people in new york city and tri-state area are still suffering. so i am worried. i am worried, more, for what my children and grandchild will experience in big storms if we don't get behind this and start resolving it. >>stuart: you have a rebate system that stops middle income and poor people from paying it but business would? >>guest: absolutely. the american interprice institute prefer the carbon tax to, for instance --. >>stuart: they prefer nothing. they do not want any tax but if they have to have one they want a straightforward tax. you think we will get it? >>guest: i do. it will be the republicans proposing it. >>stuart: the republicans the propose this? you might be right, the right would prefer a carbon tax to increased taxes on inco
changing rapidly as a factor in the environment is to knowledge across the board, primarily information technology in various manifestations and that seems like a drastic reshaping, but also can have effects on where the apparent power resources, traditional kinds of nontraditional kinds. although we often highlight the potential for empowered individuals can go around and cause havoc using new technologies and new dangers and threats, there's a new bond film out. every bond film has featured some transnational nonstate actor going on with the technology causing havoc. i'm not sure how terribly new threat that is. new technologies seem to reinforce the power of existing orders. if you think of the degree to which the national ecological revolution has reenergized the north american energy markets is fundamentally reset politics towards the traditional powers in the west rather than away from them come when you think about drones in the war on terror and the degree to which technology has allowed a tight footprint that is far more effective in many respects than the specific task of gett
and assurances to make sure your operating in a safe and secure environment are in place. those other things you are not doing begin to recognize, you start doing. that again, those of the weakness as reported at those 24 agencies other than the intelligence community. now, if you look at, and this is again the gao data, these are computer incidents reported from 2006 through 2011. you can see there has been a 700% increase in that from 5000 incidents up to 45,000 incidents per year. that is just those that have been reported and detected. many incidents go on that are not detected. when we are talking about cyber security and cyber warfare and cyber attacks we have incidents that pops up from time to time and hit the news. we all read about them, but in the event there is a true systemic cyber attack it would go after all of our systems, all of our vulnerability iies. much of we see here is probing -- in the old civil war days when they sent a scout out to detect where the enemy was. that is happening in the cyberworld. many of these are just probes to sea, are these militias intrusions been de
situations but also to look at the bigger public policy, that of the environment and that of climate change and global warming. we need to be cognizant of our stewardship over the -- our planet. we need to make certain that if these data that are compiled are telling us that there is increased prescription, for instance, over the catskills watershed, in my district, let's respond accordingly to sound public policy as it relates to our environment and our stewardship of the environment and let's be cognizant of the needs in response of this measure. you know, i'll just say this, and i know you want to add to this discussion here. i'll say this, in a time where government perhaps has been hit hard by critics out there suggesting there's no role for public sector here, we need to reduce government, i can tell you people addressing the war room, as they designated it, putting together all of the professionalism and academics and people who operate these programs and how well trained, watching that compilation, that collaborative effort of these profession alcs who are responding to public -- pr
affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> okay. so in the wake of a high profile resignation of david petraeus and the new allegations surrounding john allen in afghanistan, there are lots of new questions being asked about how the scandal could affect the future of the cia and the covert community. joining me with insight is former cia operative who is also the author of a new spy novel. let's talk about this, michael, because someone who has close tabs to the espionage community and this is playing out basically better than fiction, as we watch the details come out about this, what are people inside of the intelligence community saying and reacting to what we were watching with the general petraeus and also ge
, as does my environment just by nature. so the book is very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth and how over time it changes. the same substance -- stone, rock, water, wood -- go from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat. and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality all the way from childhood where we're immortal to our elder years where we become the thing that holds so many people we've lost and is what survives. memory is what survives. and within that memory the afterlife of so much. so thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago, i certainly did not expect i would end up here or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think what we've heard so far is that a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never have been an outpost? what's the context within my own war experience? who was i before i went
the way we govern our country. it is a good, therapeutic way to look in a nonhostile environment as to where we need to go with the country. >> john: the fact it is a nonhostile environment means it won't be covered on most cable news outlets. i'm looking over the roster of speakers. of course you're there as well as james carvel and mary madeline. i guess their merge is a model for this kind of event. you have trent lott and ted strickland, jonathan capehart and another married couple, avalon and hoover. it seems like a really, really inspiring roster of people. so i guess let me ask you why did things turn out the way they did last week on election day? >> you know, first of all, it was close but i think that -- you know, most of the pundits got it right. that is i think the people sense that the economy was getting better while slowly things were kind of turning in the right direction. and i think they were willing to give the president the benefit of the doubt under those circumstances. i also think that the
investment is going to follow countries that have a more competitive environment in taxes is one of them's a we have to reform the tax code and when you do that you will get more revenue. it's guaranteed. again, as i was talking at earlier there are opportunities here for us as a country and if you look at the congressional budget analysts this and go to the tax committee analysis what tax reform could mean in the economic growth and all of them will lead to more growth with this corporate tax reform. estimate of the president says what he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and we fought over rising tax rates. jay carney said they would veto any bill that extends the current tax rate so if he insists that tax rates go out for those making over to under $50,000 will would your recommendation before the conference in the senate? >> working in to white house is i believe a president does have a veto because i like the president's comments better than jay carney's comments. i think jay carney mabey was a little behind the curve on that because look, it makes no sense to ta
document. the job of government is to provide an environment in which our citizens can live their lives knowing that they will not be subject to nefarious actions by others. in the case of the farmers and ranchers, the terrible stories, thousands of stories like this that the chairman described. there was a failure of government to protect these people, and the results of this investigation, fulfilling congress' obligation to oversight, tell us we have many opportunities to improve and provide better protection, and these opportunities run the gamut from following the behavior of those who are in charge at entities like mf global to monitoring and modifying the ways in which the rating agencies do their business, do their job. there have been so many failures in so many ways, not only at an f global, but at other similar stories in recent history. one common strand seems to be that we need to provide our regulators with better tools to pursue the enforcement of law that existed prior to the massive imposition of dot-franc pit which did not have infinite resources and united states, nor
energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. at meineke i have options... like oil changes starting at $19.95. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> a string of murders in new york city all tied to the same weapon. the victims sharing many of the same characteristics. now, police are trying to determine whether it's coincidence or something much more sinister. our mary snow is joining us with the details. pa ri? >> well, joe, police are stopping short of calling this a serial killer but not ruling it out and gone to the fbi with help of a profiler to track a murderer who committed three murders within miles of each other. is the murder of another brooklyn store owner the work of a serial killer? that's because ballistic tests showed th
was not sufficiently angry enough in this environment that the primary process was fought in. he wasn't anti-intellectual enough. >> and downplayed his conservatism. >> that was the biggest mistake. he downplayed his conservatism from the very beginning. and i want to say again, mark halperin, the anti-intellectualism in the republican party over the past decade has been growing. that's another thing bobby jindal has been talking about. that's got to change. that's got to change. we not only have to win over hispanics, we've got to win over educated hispanics. educated african-americans. educated white people. educated people of all races with ph.d.s, an area we've been losing for decades. >> and joe, there's another issue that i know you think a lot about and thought a lot about that huntsman also talked about which is afghanistan and ending the war. that's another populist issue that i think republicans missed in 2012. the president was for winding down the war. you had others who didn't run that thought that that was an issue to tap into across the board populists including a lot of the g
are looking at, as you said, an environment in which people are in panic mode over the fiscal cliff. i think there is a lot of support, actually, because the population does not seem to understand what the fiscal cliff is and what it means. what they are hearing on television is a lot of hype about what will happen if the fiscal cliff is not avoided. that is actually generating quite a bit of support for both sides to come together. it seems adult. it seems like the right thing to do. put your partisan differences aside for the country, and find some way to avoid the cliff. what that means in practice is striking some kind of deal, what we have heard of, as a grand bargain. it is important to keep in mind that the grand bargain itself, is really a form of austerity. this is an austerity plan. when you have an economy that is still struggling to find its feet, and you are talking about imposing austerity, i think we have seen pretty clearly, watching europe over the last 3.5 years -- that is not a good idea. we definitely have time to start -- to stop and get this right, before we follow gree
it, is the things we are doing to the environment, making these things more unbearable. construction, an earthquake there was one in chile that killed less than a hundred people, fewer than a hundred people. all of these things, and people have been forced to leave the countryside, to come to the city. so we often also discussed these things and how devotion in the land -- how it causes us to have these massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goes through. these things, they are more of the things that we can do something about as a community. but these other theories, they are also talked about. >> host: in reading through your book, "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know", i was struck that so many writers return to haiti. >> guest: i think so many of us come as children. we were a lot like our parents. arkansas like they had no choice to leave. so you do have this yearning for your country. and i have a lot of family that i did quite a lot. but there is this yearning, things that are parents described as a paradise and things to f
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)